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                  Hannah Penn aka Hannah Callowhill Penn
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Hannah Penn was a second wife of William Penn, the Founder and Proprietor of the Pennsylvania Colony.

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Hannah Callowhill Penn

Hannah Callowhill Penn:

Born: Bristol, England - February 11, 1671

Died: from a stroke - December 20, 1726 Hannah Callowhill was the only surviving daughter of Thomas Callowhill, a wealthy merchant, and Anna (Hannah) Hollister.

Hannah Callowhill and William Penn were married in the Friends Meeting House in Bristol on March 5, 1696.
Children:

John (“The American”) 1699-1746

Thomas 1702-1775

Hannah Margarita 1703-1707

Margaret 1704-1750

Richard 1706-1771

Dennis 1707-1722

Hannah 1708-1709

 

Hannah Penn came to Philadelphia aboard the Canterbury together with her husband William Penn on December 10, 1699.   
She was twenty-six years old when she arrived in new Pennsylvania Colony. She was also twenty-four years younger than her prominent spouse.

Upon their arrival in Philadelphia, they would stay for a few weeks at the home of Edward Shippen a very good friend of the Founder.
Shortly after they moved to the Slate Roof House on Second Street that was owned by Samuel Carpenter.
Pennsbury Manor wasn't yet prepared for them to occupy as residence. While living in Slate Roof House, she gave birth to their first son John.

In June 1700, they relocated to their new country estate along the Delaware River, some 24 miles from Philadelphia.
At Pennsbury Manor Hannah Callowhill Penn was responsible for the management of the estate holdings.  As mistress of the Pennsbury, Hannah Callowhill Penn was in charge of all domestic workforce, that included no less than 3 Black slaves.

By 1701, political and economic demands forced William Penn and his wife Hannah Callowhill Penn to return to England.

 

William Penn wished to leave his wife and daughter Laetitia (from first marriage)  in Philadelphia, but she insisted that they go along with him back to England.
On November 2, 1701, Hannah Callowhill Penn again boarded a ship with all her possessions to cross the Atlantic Ocean.

Two months later, upon their arrival in England, Hannah Callowhill Penn was pregnant again with their second child. There, serious problems awaited Penn that needed his personal attention.

After her husband’s devastating series of strokes since 1712, Hanna Penn began handling all of Penn’s affairs.  
She effectively administered official business of the Pennsylvania Provence for six years.
She was sending instructions and advice to Colony’s governor Charles Gookin and James Logan. 

After William Penn death in July 1718, Hannah Callowhill Penn managed all financial and legal affairs, and took full control of the Pennsylvania Colony.
She was acting proprietor until her death in 1726. Hannah Callowhill Penn passed away from a heart stroke on December 20, 1726, and the proprietorship of Pennsylvania Colony transferred to their three sons: John, Thomas, and Richard.